Tag Archives: Global Health Challenge

Peer to Peer Learning – Open Ears

2016 saw the launch of the University of Dundee’s Global Health Challenge, and in 2017 as part of the Induction we invited ‘Open Ears’ to present their project and its process.

Open Ears were voted the winners of 2016 by all of the GHC 2016 participants, rather than a small panel of “expert judges”. In this way the decision was unanimous and wholesomely democratic.

Here is their final idea as captured in a short 8 minute film, with a short Q&A session with some members of the team to help others with their future journey.


Pecha Kucha

The Global Health Challenge culminates in a series of Pecha Kucha presentations given by each team, showcasing their process and idea(s) for making a change and having an impact.

In this post we offer a brief introduction to the presentation format known as ‘Pecha Kucha’ with helpful links to find further information.

‘What is Pecha Kucha 20×20?’

PechaKucha 20×20 is a simple presentation format where you show 20 images, each for 20 seconds. The images advance automatically and you talk along to the images.

Powerpoint is advised as it is easy to set-up so that the images advance automatically.

Preparation is key and rehearsals are necessary.

Further Information about Pecha Kucha and examples of them, can be found at: http://www.pechakucha.org/ Their Daily Blog is filled with inspiring examples


Helpful Tips when Preparing a Pecha Kucha for GHC

1. Practice, Practice, Practice! Rehearse, Rehearse, Rehearse!

Share and feedback with your team as you build. Be inclusive, but keep that balanced. Decisions need to be made (within the short time frame you have) in order to create a completed Pecha Kucha.  It takes practice to ensure the image/information on your slide connects with the point you are verbally making, and how each slide connects to each other to create a story and a great presentation. Time literally runs away! The more you practice and rehearse, the better prepared and more confident you will become.

2. Reflect

Consider your experiences over the weeks, sift and edit through them to include the most relevant ones and the unexpected insights.

3. Have fun! Take regular short breaks

While time can be short and a few things to juggle…don’t be scared to walk away from the computer for 10 minutes while you are creating your Pecha Kucha before coming back to it. Things can often make more sense once you’ve had some fresh air/ time away/food/drink.

4. Start Building Early

You’ve gained lots of experiences and insights over the past few weeks in the GHC. These  you can be used to help build and develop the front end of your team presentation, whilst the final touches to your are being made to the conclusion/end output of the innovative idea.

5. Be confident!

Much of the hard work has been done. As you prepare to create your PK, remember the task is to share your story.


Good Luck!!

Let’s Create a Culture of Collaboration

“Create a Collaborative Mind-set”


As GHC17 problem solvers, you’ve been tasked in identifying insights and opportunities to bring about positive change for real people experiencing very real and complex issues. Key to the success of this will be teamwork.

Let’s look to IDEO co-founder David Kelly for some advice whilst working towards innovation as multidisciplinary teams:

  1. Every team member should be given the same amount of respect
  2. Take advantage of individual skill sets: throw egos out the window
  3. Embrace the opportunity afforded by bringing together people with different backgrounds and expertise – you’ll have more resources, insight, and experience to draw from

In other words, let’s create a culture of collaboration and recognise the strengths afforded to your teams brought by the various backgrounds and fields of your members. The next five weeks are yours to explore, discover and ideate and embracing the opportunity to do this together will really make your project sing.

Building on this thinking and echoing some of the advice shared by GHC16 winners Open Ears in our induction session, here are some final top tips from your GHC facilitators for successful teamwork:

  • COMMUNICATE: Establish and use somewhere central, like Facebook or the GHC webmail platform to communicate with your group. Share where you’re at and discuss progress in between meetings.
  • BE MINDFUL of the commitment you have made to the team. It is good professional practice to give this your full attention – if meetings are arranged, attend them. 
  • PROJECT PLAN & DELEGATE: Compile a task list – who does what and when?
  • PREPARE for your final presentation. Make sure every team member is clear on their role within the presentation and collect and compile visuals to communicate your project well.

Good to See You – Welcome to GHC!


Welcome everyone to Global Health Challenge!

It is a delight to welcome you. My name is Louise and I am one of a large team across the University who have joined together to design and make happen the Global Health Challenge. You’ll get to meet and work with the team as the afternoon and challenge progresses.

First, let me tell you a little bit about Global Health Challenge.

Global Health Challenge is a glimpse of the future; it’s a change agent with a concern about doing things differently. It is about challenging the norm. We’re here to raise the game, to raise your game, and ours. We’re doing that by pushing ourselves out of our comfort zone, to work in new ways and with people we’ve not worked with before. Everything about this initiative is voluntary, and that is what makes it such a compelling story. We’re here to do some good.

Let me share with you an interesting fact, the world population is forecast to increase by two-thirds in the 21st Century. Did you know that? For me it’s the call to action that has impacted most. Let me tell you why. In the 19th Century there were 1 billion people on the planet. In 2017 there are just over 7.6 billion, and by the end of the 21st century it is expected to be over 12 million. This is an exorbitantly high rate of growth with an extra 50 million people added to the Earth’s population, each year.

How does this connect to the Global Health Challenge? Every single person on the planet requires help with their health. This population scenario requires us – you and I – to very carefully, sensitively yet radically rethink ‘normal’.

What I’m saying is, Global Health Challenge has an entrepreneurial character – it’s not about teaching you to become an entrepreneur – but you could use it to help with that, if you wish.

Our commitment to you is to help you stand out from the crowd, to afford you opportunities to develop discovery, to think, be enterprising, to let you fail and get things wrong, and to work with you to understand how to fix it. It’s also to respectfully tell you to get over yourself if one of your ideas isn’t taken up by the team, because teamwork is what is needed. We’re committed to building your agility, resilience and your capacity to empathise with the world around you. Why? So that, should you chose to, you may lead, manage, innovate, and excel in your future professional worlds. These skills enhance the likelihood that you will identify and capture the right opportunity at the right time for the right reason.

Every single person in this space is formidable. You have something unique and very special to bring to the challenge we are about to embark upon.  We really want you to do something great! We will do everything we can to help facilitate your journey.



With thanks to Professor Heidi Neck, Babson College USA, for inspiring this welcome.

Curious Minds

Venturing into the unknown

Wednesday 16th October 2016 was an auspicious day at Dundee University. All nine Schools from across the campus came together for the first time, committed to looking at new ways of working to solve some of the most pressing health and social care challenges of our time. With 36 fresh thinking students from Art and Design, Dentistry, Education and Social Work, Humanities, Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Life Sciences, Science and Engineering, Social Sciences, and support from six local organisations – Amino, Deaf Hub, DialOp, Hearing Voices, Homeless Populations and PAMIS – we ventured forward as a new, ambitious collective!

We pitched up at the School of Art & Design in the heart of the campus, and used the BarCamp method to kick-start our work. Why BarCamp? It is an ‘unconference‘; a meeting where everyone can contribute, where everyone can present a topic and generate a discussion (Azzimonti et al, 2015). Mindful that people would be meeting each other for the first time, and had no previous experience of working together, our aim for Day 1 of the project was simple: to enable everyone to develop an understanding of the project, as well as an understanding of each other and the creative process about to be undertaken.

The subject demands agility, critical thinking and teamwork; the project is time sensitive (with only four sessions out with the induction) and so, in setting the scene we talked about the importance of curiosity – of accepting we don’t have all of the answers, of venturing into the unknown together, and leading the navigation into unchartered waters with questions.

With jazz playing in the background, 6 hours of dynamic conversation and questioning pursued, ending in six self selecting teams to work on an issue of their choice and with an organisation of their choice.  Here’s a visual snapshot of Day 1 #UoDGHC16 :

GHC Blog Image_day 1