Tag: scale

Arena by Páraic McGloughlin

Irish artist Paraic Mc Gloughlin used thousands of Google Earth images to create this mesmerising video. There’s a nice interview with Paraic about his inspiration and process here: https://directorsnotes.com/2018/04/04/paraic-mcgloughlin-arena/ 

The Boyle Family

Another very interesting collective of artists to consider when thinking about scale is the Boyle Family. This short film by the Tate gives a good introduction to their work. You can learn more about them via their website: www.boylefamily.co.uk

Galaxy Zoo

If you ever feel like zooming right out and changing your perspective you could take a look at Galaxy Zoo or the series of space exploration projects from Zooniverse (see below).

Microscopy at UoD

Zoom in with these open source microscopy projects online.

The Jefferson Grid

The Jefferson Grid is one of my favourite Instagram accounts – a project by photographer and visual artist,  Shabtai Pinchevsky. Shabtai has been exploring satellite images of the USA from above trying to identify human-made interventions in the landscape that arose since Thomas Jefferson proposed a land planning system based on square miles over two centuries ago. Read more about the project via the New York Times here.

Cosmic Zoom animation

“This short animation transports us from the farthest conceivable point of the universe to the tiniest particle of existence, an atom of a living human cell. The art of animation and animation camera achieve this exhilarating journey with a freshness and clarity. Without words.”
https://www.nfb.ca/film/cosmic_zoom/

I discovered this incredible animation around the same time as I the equally impressive Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames. Both pieces were inspired by Cosmic View: The Universe in 40 Jumps an essay by Dutch educator Kees Boeke.

Charles and Ray Eames – Powers of Ten

I frequently come back to this groundbreaking video by Charles and Ray Eames as it’s such a great example of how to consider changes in scale and different perspectives.

Powers of Ten takes us on an adventure in magnitudes. Starting at a picnic by the lakeside in Chicago, this famous film transports us to the outer edges of the universe. Every ten seconds we view the starting point from ten times farther out until our own galaxy is visible only a s a speck of light among many others. Returning to Earth with breathtaking speed, we move inward- into the hand of the sleeping picnicker- with ten times more magnification every ten seconds. Our journey ends inside a proton of a carbon atom within a DNA molecule in a white blood cell. POWERS OF TEN © 1977 EAMES OFFICE LLC (Available at www.eamesoffice.com)

Links: Aerial Bold

While doing some research into the connections between topography and typography I stumbled across the fascinating Aerial Bold project (created by Benedikt Groß and Joey Lee). Go and have some fun with typing letter forms taken from satellite images of our planet and then read more about the incredible process behind the project.

© 2020 Shapes and Letters

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑